Baseball in the 1920’s


Babe Ruth

          Born: 1895 – Pigtown (a neighborhood in Baltimore) Maryland.

          Lifetime batting average .342

          First major major league game played at age 19 

          Last major league game played at age 40 

256px-Babe_Ruth2

Babe Ruth Quotations:

“Don’t let the fear of striking out hold you back.”

“Every strike brings me closer to the next home run.”

“I didn’t mean to hit the umpire with the dirt,but I did mean to hit that bastard in the stands.”

***

Lou Gehrig

          Born: 1903 – East Harlem, Manhattan

          Lifetime batting average .340

          First major major league game played at age 20 

          Last major league game played at age 36 

Lou Gehrig 1

Lou Gehrig Quotations:

“The ballplayer who loses his head, who can’t keep his cool, is worse than no ballplayer at all.”

“There is no room in baseball for discrimination. It is our national pastime and a game for all.”

“I’m not a headline guy. I know that as long as I was following Ruth to the plate I could have stood on my head and no one would have known the difference.”

***

Mel Ott

          Born: 1909 – Gretna, Louisiana

          Lifetime batting average .304

          First major major league game played at age 17 

          Last major league game played at age 38 

Mel Ott

Mel Ott Quotations:

“Yogi seemed to be doing everything wrong, yet everything came out right.”

“He stopped everything behind the plate and hit everything in front of it.”

***

Ty Cobb

          Born: 1886 – Narrows, Georgia

          Lifetime batting average .366

          First major major league game played at age 19 

          Last major league game played at age 42 

Ty Cobb

Ty Cobb Quotations:

“I had to fight all my life to survive. They were all against me… but I beat the bastards and left them in the ditch.”

“The great trouble with baseball today is that most of the players are in the game for the money and that’s it, not for the love of it, the excitement of it, the thrill of it.”

“When I began playing the game, baseball was about as gentlemanly as a kick in the crotch.”

***

Satchel Paige

          Born: 1906 – Mobil, Alabama

          Major league earned run average 3.29

          First major major league game played at age 42 

          Last major league game played at age 59 

Satchel Paige

Satchel Paige Quotations:

“Work like you don’t need the money. Love like you’ve never been hurt. Dance like nobody’s watching.”  

“Age is a case of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it don’t matter.”

“My pitching philosophy is simple – keep the ball way from the bat.”

***

OUTTAKES

Babe Ruth

Friends

Mel Ott 1

Ty Cobb 1

Satchel Paige 1

THE END

Sally Stanford – Sausalito, CA

The Sally Stanford Story

from Eileen Keremitsis, Ph.D.

  “Sinners never give up!” declared Sally Stanford, after losing her first political campaign.

Sally Stanford broke more rules than most. She married seven times—but never to a Stanford—used more than two dozen names and beat seventeen arrests.

 Sally Stanford Mugshot

Sally Stanford

Preteen: At age seven, she convinced local golfers to let her work as a caddy.

In Her Twenties: During the period when Al Capone was machine-gunning fellow bootleggers, she fed salty roast chickens to her speakeasy customers to heighten their thirst.

In Her Forties: Investing Prohibition profits in Tenderloin hotels, Sally polished her rough edges and climbed uphill (Nob Hill) to become San Francisco’s most successful madam. She kicked out Humphrey Bogart for disorderly conduct, welcomed Errol Flynn, and entertained delegates to the 1945 United Nations organizing conference.

In Her Seventies: Mayor of Sausalito

“In 1985 (three years after she died), the City of Sausalito commissioned a drinking fountain to honor Sally and her dog, Leland. Local potter Eric Norstad constructed a multiple person drinking fountain with a basin inscribed with the words “Have a drink on Sally”. The runoff poured to a long knee length basin that reads “Have a drink on Leland” for the dogs visiting the site. The drinking fountain is located at the Sausalito Ferry Building.”  Wikipedia

Sally Stanford walking her dog Leland – Cal Bear fans have got to love that.

Valhalla

In the novel, Midnight Run 1932, Sally Stanford’s Valhalla is fictitiously used as headquarters for a Marin County bootlegging operation.

The History of Erections 1887 to 1931

*

*

The Eiffel Tower

July 1887

July 1887

*

December 1887

December 1887

*

March 1888

March 1888

*

May 1888

May 1888

*

August 1888

August 1888

*

December 1888

December 1888

*

March 1889

March 1889

*

March 1889

March 1889

*

April 1889

April 1889

The Eiffel Tower is 1,063 feet (324 meters) tall, including the antenna at the top.  Without the antenna, it is 984 feet (300 m).  It was the tallest manmade structure until the Chrysler Building was built in New York in 1930.

*

The Chrysler Building 1930

Chrysler Building 1930

Chrysler Building 1930

*

The Empire State Building 1931

The Empire State Building under construction 1931

The Empire State Building under construction 1931

That’s the Chrysler Building in the background.

*

Does size really matter?  It appears that it does.  

<<<  >>>

Prohibition Cars 1928

Prohibition Cars.

The Metropolitan Police of St. Louis drove 1928 Packards with shiny bells on the front.

1928 Packard

The Chicago Police, on the other hand, drove Fords and some green 1928 Cadillacs with black fenders.  Behind the front grill, the Caddies were equipped with flashing red lights and a siren.

1928 Cadillac

So, you may ask, what did Al Capone drive?

Al Capone also had a green 1928 Caddy with black fenders, a siren, flashing red lights, and a police band receiver.  It was the twin of the police issue.  In addition, it had 3,000 pounds of lead and one inch bulletproof glass all around.  Capone’s 1928 Cadillac was so well fortified that for his own protection President Roosevelt used it after the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941.

<<<  >>>

Alcatraz Island

The first prisoners held on Alcatraz Island were not bank robbers or thugs; they were Confederate sympathizers, disobedient soldiers, and Native Americans.  From 1861 to 1933, Alcatraz Island was a military prison.  In 1934, it became a federal prison.

Born of necessity, perhaps even political expediency, the prison at Alcatraz represents the federal government’s response to post-Prohibition, post-Depression America.  Both the institution and the men confined within its walls are a part of this era.  Prisons are a reflection of society.

1934, Prisoner Number 238 Before Alcatraz

1952, Number 238 Still in Alcatraz

Alcatraz prisoner number 238 was loosely associated with John Dillinger and closely associated with “Baby Face” Nelson.  He was with Nelson in the shootout where “Baby Face” was mortally wounded with 17 rounds in him (238 was captured a month  later).    Number 238 was a California native whose association with Nelson began on a small dairy ranch in Santa Venetia, just north of San Rafael, California.

<<<  >>>

Two True Stories

Two Stories BOTH TRUE – and worth reading

STORY NUMBER ONE
Many years ago, Al Capone virtually owned Chicago enmeshing the windy city in everything from bootlegged booze and prostitution to murder.

Easy Eddie

Capone had a lawyer nicknamed “Easy Eddie.” He was Capone’s lawyer for a good reason. Eddie was very good! In fact, Eddie’s skill at legal maneuvering kept Big Al out of jail for a long time. To show his appreciation, Capone paid him very well. Not only was the money big, but Eddie got special dividends, as well. For instance, he and his family occupied a fenced-in mansion with live-in help and all of the conveniences of the day. The estate was so large that it filled an entire Chicago City block. Eddie lived the high life of the Chicago mob and gave little consideration to the atrocity that went on around him.

Eddie did have one soft spot, however. He had a son that he loved dearly. Eddie saw to it that his young son had clothes, cars, and a good education. Nothing was withheld. Price was no object. And, despite his involvement with organized crime, Eddie even tried to teach him right from wrong. Eddie wanted his son to be a better man than he was.

Yet, with all his wealth and influence, there were two things he couldn’t give his son; he couldn’t pass on a good name or a good example. One day, Easy Eddie reached a difficult decision. Easy Eddie wanted to rectify wrongs he had done.

He decided he would go to the authorities and tell the truth about Al “Scarface” Capone, clean up his tarnished name, and offer his son some semblance of integrity. To do this, he would have to testify against The Mob, and he knew that the cost would be great. So, he testified.

Within the year, Easy Eddie’s life ended in a blaze of gunfire on a lonely Chicago street. But in his eyes, he had given his son the greatest gift he had to offer; at the greatest price he could ever pay. Police removed from his pockets a rosary, a crucifix, a religious medallion, and a poem clipped from a magazine.

The poem read:

“The clock of life is wound but once,

And no man has the power

To tell just when the hands will stop,

At late or early hour.

Now is the only time you own.

Live, love, toil with a will.

Place no faith in time.

For the clock may soon be still.”

STORY NUMBER TWO

Butch O’Hare

World War II produced many heroes. One such man was Lieutenant Commander Butch O’Hare. He was a fighter pilot assigned to the aircraft carrier Lexington in the South Pacific. One day his entire squadron was sent on a mission. After he was airborne, he looked at his fuel gauge and realized that someone had forgotten to top off his fuel tank. He would not have enough fuel to complete his mission and get back to his ship. His flight leader told him to return to the carrier. Reluctantly, he dropped out of formation and headed back to the fleet. As he was returning to the mother ship, he saw something that turned his blood cold; a squadron of Japanese aircraft was speeding its way toward the American fleet.

The American fighters were gone on a sortie, and the fleet was all but defenseless. He couldn’t reach his squadron and bring them back in time to save the fleet. Nor could he warn the fleet of the approaching danger. There was only one thing to do. He must somehow divert them from the fleet.

Laying aside all thoughts of personal safety, he dove into the formation of Japanese planes. Wing-mounted 50 caliber’s blazed as he charged in, attacking one surprised enemy plane and then another. Butch wove in and out of the now broken formation and fired at as many planes as possible until all his ammunition was finally spent. Undaunted, he continued the assault. He dove at the planes, trying to clip a wing or tail in hopes of damaging as many enemy planes as possible, rendering them unfit to fly. Finally, the exasperated Japanese squadron took off in another direction.

Deeply relieved, Butch O’Hare and his tattered fighter limped back to the carrier. Upon arrival, he reported in and related the event surrounding his return. The film from the gun-camera mounted on his plane told the tale. It showed the extent of Butch’s daring attempt to protect his fleet. He had, in fact, destroyed five enemy aircraft. This took place on February 20, 1942, and for that action Butch became the Navy’s first Ace of WW II, and the first Naval Aviator to win the Medal of Honor.

A year later Butch was killed in aerial combat at the age of 29. His hometown would not allow the memory of this WW II hero to fade, and today, O’Hare Airport in Chicago is named in tribute to the courage of this great man. So, the next time you find yourself at O’Hare International, give some thought to visiting Butch’s memorial displaying his statue and his Medal of Honor. It’s located between Terminals 1 and 2.

SO WHAT DO THESE TWO STORIES HAVE TO DO WITH EACH OTHER?

Butch O’Hare was “Easy Eddie’s” son.

Please feel free to reblog or retweet this post.

<<<  >>>

“Baby Face” Nelson

Nelson as a teenager

“Baby Face” Nelson was one of the killers in the bootlegging and prohibition era.  At age twelve, he was arrested for shooting another child in the jaw.  That act earned him a year in jail.  At age thirteen, he was again incarcerated.  This time he got eighteen months for car theft and joyriding.

Nelson quickly graduated to armed home invasions.  His next progression was a combination of home invasions and bank robberies sometimes with only a few days in between.  During the commission of his first botched robbery, the five foot four inch Nelson killed three people and wounded three more.   Days later he killed again.

Nelson now a killer

Nelson was apprehended, sent to prison, escaped, and headed west.  He ended up in Marin County and spent some time cooling off as a milker on one of the small dairy ranches in Santa Venetia.  Here he became involved in bootlegging in Marin and formed a lifelong friendship with a local Marin County boy named John Paul Chase (aka: Earl Butler).

At age twenty-five, Baby Face Nelson was mortally wounded from seventeen FBI bullets.  Chase was with Nelson when he died.

<<<  >>>